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Do you drive one of the top 10 most stolen cars in Britain?

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If you’re looking to buy a new car, it’s worth checking whether it’s on the list of most stolen vehicles in the UK.

Thief trying to break into a car

Top-of-the-range BMWs and Range Rovers, as well as Ford Focuses and Vauxhalls, make up many of the motors pinched. According to figures from stolen vehicle recovery service, Tracker, the BMW X5 is the favourite among car crooks, topping it’s most stolen and recovered table for the sixth year in a row.

The UK’s most stolen cars:

  1. BMW X5

  2. Mercedes-Benz C-class

  3. Range Rover Sport

  4. Mercedes-Benz E-class

  5. Land Rover Discovery

  6. BMW M3

  7. Range Rover Vogue

  8. Audi RS4

  9. Mercedes-Benz ML

  10. Mercedes-Benz C63

The data comes as the number of taken cars with a keyless entry system has reached an all-time high, showing that felons are becoming more able to outwit automotive technology. Last year more than £11 million worth of illegally acquired vehicles were retrieved and returned to their owners.

The average value of cars stolen and recovered in 2014 increased by over 8%, hitting £25,600, compared with £23,600 in 2013. For the past three years, the family/business-orientated BMW line-up has dominated the top 10 stolen car list. But 2014 saw an upturn in the range of Mercedes-Benz and Jaguar Land Rover marques being grabbed and retrieved, too.

The Mercedes C Class moved up a place to take the number two slot, while the Range Rover Sport jumps four places, up to third position. Plus the Land Rover Discovery makes a new entry at fifth, suggesting that 4x4s are in big demand for organised car crime gangs.

Whilst Porsche enjoyed year-on-year new car sales growth in 2014, it dropped out of the Tracker top ten most stolen and recovered league table completely; it sat at ninth place in 2013 with the 911.

Thief using device

Owners of cheaper cars fitted with keyless entry systems have also reported them being taken without consent. After two decades of declining motor theft figures, British police forces are now reporting that, nationally, the number is on the increase again. In the 12 months to March 2015, 22,057 vehicle thefts were reported to the Metropolitan Police Service, alone.

That’s a growth of 6.5% on the preceding year. Now police say the best way of thwarting the thugs is to use outdated technology. Yes, you read it correctly, the boys in blue are now advocating the use of the steering lock – most commonly used in Britain way back in the decade that taste forgot - the 1980s!

It seems, for now at least, no vehicle with a keyless entry system is safe.

Steering wheel lock

Owners of cheaper cars fitted with keyless entry systems have also reported them being taken without consent. After two decades of declining motor theft figures, British police forces are now reporting that, nationally, the number is on the increase again. In the 12 months to March 2015, 22,057 vehicle thefts were reported to the Metropolitan Police Service, alone.

That’s a growth of 6.5% on the preceding year. Now police say the best way of thwarting the thugs is to use outdated technology. Yes, you read it correctly, the boys in blue are now advocating the use of the steering lock – most commonly used in Britain way back in the decade that taste forgot - the 1980s!

It seems, for now at least, no vehicle with a keyless entry system is safe.

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