Skip navigation

Sock drawer Brits' top hiding place

Sock drawerThe sock drawer is the top hiding place for valuables at home, according to new research by Confused.com. But is your safe place a safe bet for thieves?

How much are your valuables worth?

Brits estimate the contents of their homes to be worth around £38,000, according to home insurance quotes through Confused.com in 2012.

But it seems householders need to be more creative when it comes to hiding jewellery and other valuables around the home and away from the prying eyes of potential thieves.

Sock drawer is top hiding place

The most popular hiding place for jewellery and other valuables in the home is the sock drawer, with 13 of those questioned saying this is their safe place of choice.

This is followed by the top of the wardrobe (9 per cent), under the bed (9 per cent), and under the sink (6 per cent).

This is according to our exclusive poll of 2,000 people.

More than half of homeowners polled – 51 per cent - admitted keeping their valuables in such vulnerable places, despite knowing that these are obvious places for a thief to look.

And this is despite the fact that a fifth of homeowners polled said they had been victims of burglary.

Lack of 'safe place' creativity

Gareth Lane, head of home insurance at Confused.com, says opting for these obvious "safe places" shows that Brits need to be more creative at hiding valuables.

Lane says: "This research is proof we need to get smarter when protecting our possessions.

"Taking steps to prevent a burglary - from locking windows and doors to storing valuables in a secure safe - are just a few simple things that you can do to ensure that your home and its contents stay as safe as possible.

"The harder we make it for the thief to gain entry, the better.

"However, on the unfortunate occasion where they do gain entrance we need to think really carefully on how we can prevent them from locating our favourite possessions."

Safety-conscious victims

But being a victim of burglary does make people more safety conscious.

Nearly half of burglary victims – 45 per cent - have installed a burglar alarm to protect themselves from thieves.

And more than a third have purchased extra window locks (39 per cent) or door locks (36 per cent).

And some homeowners are so determined to keep out thieves that they’ve gone as far as buying a dog to protect their property (15 per cent).

20% hide cash around the home

Previous research by Confused.com found that one in five householders keep the lion's share of their spare money at home or in their cars.

The average amount hidden at home is just over £1,100.

More than 50 per cent of those polled cited "rubbish interest rates" and a lack of trust in Britain's banks as the top reasons for hiding cash at home.

And it seems that, as with jewellery and other valuables, the sock or underwear drawer is the hiding place of choice for cash.

The bedroom is the most popular hiding place with 30 per cent of those questioned keeping cash under the mattress or in an underwear drawer, the poll found.

Risky business

But keeping cash at home can be a risk as most home insurance policies will only cover cash stolen from the home up to a certain amount – for example £250 or £500.

If you have more than this taken, you may not be able to claim.

You may also have to demonstrate where the money came from and explain why it was being kept at home.

What do you think?

Is the sock or underwear drawer your hiding place of choice for cash, jewellery and other valuables?

Have you ever come a cropper as a result of hiding valuables around the home?

We want to hear from you! You can share your views on the message board below.

Compare home insurance - you could find a great deal in minutes Get a home quote




Like this? Share it


Looking for cheap home insurance?

Compare prices from up to 80 trusted home insurance providers - such as Tesco, Churchill and More Than.

Home Insurance

Naphtalia Loderick

Naphtalia Loderick

Naphtalia Loderick reports on all things personal finance at Confused.com. She started out on a weekly newspaper, via a national news agency and a stint in the fun but ‘not as glamorous as it appears on screen’ world of TV at the BBC researching consumer films for The One Show.

View more from Naphtalia



Most popular articles


Got a home insurance question?

See all related questions
Home Insurance FAQ